The Colosseum

  • While stands the Coliseum, Rome shall stand; When falls the Coliseum, Rome shall fall, And when Rome falls the World.
  • (Byron, 1904)[1]

Table of Contents
1. Introduction
2. Speakers, audiences and issues
3. Sources
The capacity of the Colosseum is impressive. In comparison:
the biggest Arena, holds around 50.000 people,
whereas the Colosseum could fit up to 65.000 Romans. [2]

1. Introduction


Most people will know the Colosseum. It is one of the most important buildings of Rome to this day and a true eyecatcher. But the quote by Byron that is shown above, taken from one of his poems dating back to 1904, seems radical in its nature. How can the destiny of Rome be linked to one single building?

In this Wiki, we will show you what the function of the Colosseum has been through time and how it has effected Rome. To provide a complete picture of the function of the Colosseum through time, we created three seperate Wiki-pages, each concerning the Colosseum in a different timeframe. In the first Wiki-page,we will discuss the Colosseum in the time when it was built. Who built the Colosseum and why? Why was it built on that particular location? Why was a Colosseum built and not a different type of building, such as a bath house? In the next Wiki-page, we will discuss the Colosseum in the Middle Ages (500-1500). Did the function of the Colosseum change? Why and what was the new function? Who played a part in that development? In the third Wiki-page, we will discuss the relationship between the Colosseum and Christianity through time. In the conclusion, we will answer the question how it's possible that the Colosseum evolved from a violent gruesome place to a holy site for Christians (see the pictures below).




How is it possible that the Colosseum went from a place of horror ... ... to a holy place for Christians?

2. Speakers, audiences and issues



In this Wiki, we will speak of speakers, audiences and issues. With speaker, we mean the party that uses the Colosseum as a solution to solve a certain problem. With 'issue', we mean the problem that the speaker is facing. The speaker uses the Colosseum for this issue to send a certain message to the Roman people, who are the 'audience'. In this Wiki-page, we will answer the question why certain subjects chose the Colosseum as the solution to their issues. In the conclusion, we will find out how the speaker, audience and issue changed through time. Click on one of the links below to skip to each Wiki-page.


Antiquity Middle Ages Christianity Conclusion

By Emma de Groot & Dennis Rauwerda

3. Sources


  • [1]Byron, L. (1904). Descriptive Poems: III. Places The Coliseum, in: B. Carman, & e. al, The World's best poetry. Philadelphia: John D Morris.
  • [2] Wikipedia. Retrieved from this link.