Donato Bramante

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Main page: Ad Fontes Donato Bramante Similar Buildings to the Tempietto

Contents
1. The life of Donato Bramante
2. List of architectural works by Donato Bramante
Sources

1. The life of Donato Bramante


Portrait of Bramante [15]

Donato d'Angelo, commonly known as Donatello Bramante, just Bramante (= 'arden', intensely desiring) or Bramante Ruinante (= Bramante the wrecker), (1444 - 1514) was born in a small village located in the North-East of the former Papal State of Urbino in Italy [1],[2],[3],[4]. He was the son of a wealthy farmer and enjoyed thus some, but not much education in his younger years.[5]This resulted in Bramante being able to write, but not to read Latin or Greek, which was allotted only to the most prosperous among the living.

At the age of 28 Bramante was introduced to Duke Ludovico Sforza of Milan (1452 - 1508) by Bramante's aunt Battista Sforza (d. 1472) (who was married to Federigo da Montefeltro). The following two decades, Bramante stayed with the Montefeltros in Milan to work for the Duke of Sforza in exchange for more education.[5] At that time the court of the Montefeltros was the centre of humanist artists in the North of Italy. Years later, Renaissance painter Raphael (1483 - 1520) would start his studies here as well.[6] This meant that Bramante's education consisted of not just painting, but also of humanistic ideals and beliefs, which would become important during his later career. The humanistic education was strengthened by his encounters with Leonardo da Vinci (1452 - 1519), also working in Milan at the time. Via Da Vinci, Bramante learned about Florentine Art and Vitruvius' (ca. 85 - 20 BC) ideals of measurement[7]. When in 1499 the French troops entered Milan, Ludovico Sforza left, and with him the cultural prosperity. Bramante decided to leave as well[8], [9]. Because of his work in restoration and his trademark in painting architectural images, it was not surprising for Bramante to try his luck in architecture.[10]

When arriving in Rome, Bramante was confronted with ancient ruins and major buildings like the Thermal Baths, the Pantheon and the Colosseum. This encounter changed his style in many ways. He no longer used elegance and grace in his architecture, but powerful, grandiose and most of all huge constructions. Rome was, after all, still the city of Emperors [7],[10]

The knowledge of both Classical and Florentine architecture soon made Bramante a sought after architect in Rome. It thus did not take long before Pope Julius II, a pope focussed on renewal of the city of Rome as a spiritual centre, hired him as his personal architect[11](See: Christianity: Problems). The ultimate and also last job started by Bramante was no less than the rebuilding of the basilica of St. Peter as we know it today.


2. List of architectural works by Donato Bramante [12][13][14]


Milan:
1479-1490: San Satyre
1480 - 1498: Santa Maria by San Satyre
1492: Santa Maria delle Grazie

Rome:
1502: Tempietto
1504: Cloister of Santa Maria della Pace
1506: Palazzo Vaticano
1506: San Pietro (start)
1509: Coro di Santa Maria del Popolo

Loreto:
1510: Santa Casa di Loreto

Abbiate Grasso:
1497: Dome Facade

Umbria, Todi:
1504 - 1617: Santa Maria della Consolazione

Sources


  1. Hughes, Robert. Rome: A Cultural History. London: Orion Publishing, 2012 pp 251.
  2. Hughes, Robert. Rome: A Cultural History. London: Orion Publishing, 2012 pp 257.
  3. Reymond, Marcel. Les Grands Artistes, Leur Vie, Leur Oevre: Bramante et l'Architecture Italienne au XVIe Siècle. Ed. Henri Laurens. Étude Critique, Paris: Librairie Renouard,1897 pp 16
  4. Reymond, Marcel. Les Grands Artistes, Leur Vie, Leur Oevre: Bramante et l'Architecture Italienne au XVIe Siècle. Ed. Henri Laurens. Étude Critique, Paris: Librairie Renouard,1897 pp 11
  5. Freiberg Jack, Bramante's Tempietto and the Spanish Crown (2005) Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome, vol.50, pp. 154
  6. Freiberg Jack, Bramante's Tempietto and the Spanish Crown (2005) Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome, vol.50, pp. 181-182
  7. Hughes, Robert. Rome: A Cultural History. London: Orion Publishing, 2012 pp 252
  8. http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/77472/Donato-Bramante Accessed October 2014
  9. Reymond, Marcel. Les Grands Artistes, Leur Vie, Leur Oevre: Bramante et l'Architecture Italienne au XVIe Siècle. Ed. Henri Laurens. Étude Critique, Paris: Librairie Renouard,1897 pp 16-19
  10. Reymond, Marcel. Les Grands Artistes, Leur Vie, Leur Oevre: Bramante et l'Architecture Italienne au XVIe Siècle. Ed. Henri Laurens. Étude Critique, Paris: Librairie Renouard,1897 pp 28
  11. Reymond, Marcel. Les Grands Artistes, Leur Vie, Leur Oevre: Bramante et l'Architecture Italienne au XVIe Siècle. Ed. Henri Laurens. Étude Critique, Paris: Librairie Renouard,1897 pp 23
  12. Reymond, Marcel. Les Grands Artistes, Leur Vie, Leur Oevre: Bramante et l'Architecture Italienne au XVIe Siècle. Ed. Henri Laurens. Étude Critique, Paris: Librairie Renouard,1897 pp 122
  13. http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/522996/Santa-Maria-della-Consolazione
  14. Hughes, Robert. Rome: A Cultural History. London: Orion Publishing, 2012 pp 260
  15. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/35/Donato_Bramante.jpg